Thursday, January 12, 2017

3 Books I want to Reread


This year I want to reread books that I loved, and will quickly say are "favorite" reads. I want to see if they still have the same impact, and the same adoration. These three books, I can picture myself where I was the first time I started reading them. I remember what time in my life it was, where I was living, where I was when I was reading them...

White Oleander by Janet Fitch




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Everywhere hailed as a novel of rare beauty and power, White Oleander tells the unforgettable story of Ingrid, a brilliant poet imprisoned for murder, and her daughter, Astrid, whose odyssey through a series of Los Angeles foster homes--each its own universe, with its own laws, its own dangers, its own hard lessons to be learned--becomes a redeeming and surprising journey of self-discovery.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath




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Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity. 

Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith




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The beloved American classic about a young girl's coming-of-age at the turn of the century, Betty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a poignant and moving tale filled with compassion and cruelty, laughter and heartache, crowded with life and people and incident. The story of young, sensitive, and idealistic Francie Nolan and her bittersweet formative years in the slums of Williamsburg has enchanted and inspired millions of readers for more than sixty years. By turns overwhelming, sublime, heartbreaking, and uplifting, the daily experiences of the unforgettable Nolans are raw with honesty and tenderly threaded with family connectedness -- in a work of literary art that brilliantly captures a unique time and place as well as incredibly rich moments of universal experience.

4 comments:

  1. I need to read The Bell Jar for the first time still.

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    1. I remember reading The Bell Jar in college, and it was a book that literature students "had" to read.

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  2. I read A Tree Grows In Brooklyn for the first time a couple of years ago for a book club selection. I'd been wanting to read it for a long time because I'd seen the movie on TV when I saw a kid. I wondered if it would hold up and if it would fascinate me as an adult the way the movie did when I was a kid. I'm happy to say that I enjoyed the book and my book club did, too!

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    1. I'm pretty sure I read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn as a book club read the first time around as well. I'm hoping to get to reread it soon.

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